Dr Neil Stanley Independent Sleep Expert
BACK Pilkington, Works, 340 here does not seem to be describing the “up to an hour or more of quiet wakefulness midway through the night” that “interrupted the rest of most Western Europeans.” The night is the quietest time to devise things in; for then all things be quiet, every man keepeth his house and draweth to rest; no noise is made abroad; the eyes are not troubled with looking at many things; the senses are not drawn away with fantasies, and the mind is quiet. Jefferson to Dr. Vine Utley, March 21, 1819, Thomas Jefferson, Writings, Merrill D. Peterson, ed. (New York, 1984), 1417 “I am not so regular in my sleep as the Doctor says he was, devoting to it from five to eight hours, according as my company or the book I am reading interests me; and I never go to bed without an hour, or half hour's previous reading of something moral, whereon to ruminate in the intervals of sleep. But whether I retire to bed early or late, I rise with the sun”. here  Note that he talks about “the intervals of sleep” plural not a single interval as envisaged by Ekirch’s assertion that “Until the close of the early modern era, Western Europeans on most evenings experienced two major intervals of sleep bridged by up to an hour or more of quiet wakefulness” (It may be petty to point out that Jefferson says that he reads “something moral” rather than “moral philosophy” as claimed by Ekirch) Girolamo Cardano, The Book of My Life (1930; rpt. edn., New York, 1962), 82;  here does not seem to be describing the “up to an hour or more of quiet wakefulness midway through the night” that “interrupted the rest of most Western Europeans.” As I rode or ate or conversed, or as I lay in bed sleepless, I was ever meditating upon something, for I had in mind that common adage: "Multa modica faciunt unum satis." That is, the many small things soon make one of size! Timothy Nourse, Campania foelix (1700; rpt. edn., New York, 1982), 175 does not seem to be describing the “up to an hour or more of quiet wakefulness midway through the night” that “interrupted the rest of most Western Europeans.” “The seasons of Rest to others, and the silence of the Night are fittest for Deliberation” Leisure Hours Employed for the Benefit of Those Who Would Wish to Begin the World as Wise as Others End It (London, 1759), 10  I can find nothing relevant on page 10 although this passage occurs on page 170   It is best to fleep over every resolution of consequence ; and between the timorous resolution taken during the languor of the night, and the rashness occasioned by the freshness of the morning, the medium will be found to be the truth. although this passage does not seem to be describing the “up to an hour or more of quiet wakefulness midway through the night” that  “interrupted the rest of most Western Europeans.” BACK
© Dr. Neil Stanley 2013-2018