Dr Neil Stanley Independent Sleep Expert
BACK  ‘A Doctor’, ‘No Need to Fear Insomnia’, Dundee Courier, 16 Jan. 1939. However it is clear that this passage refers to the time at the start of the night before sleep “In the first place then, after settling down comfortably in bed, one should proceed to recapitulate the experiences of the day.”and thus has nothing to do with the idea of ‘segmented sleep’ or middle of the night insomnia. Also the advice is in general, the only difference is ‘bad sleeper’ will find that they have more time to do it. It is not the actual deprivation of sleep with which we should concern ourselves: it is the fact that when one does lie awake one tends to worry. And to worry is a thing entirely indefensible. Therefore the problem resolves itself into one of learning the art of thought control. One has to learn how to turn one’s thoughts during the wakeful hours of the night into pleasant instead of unpleasant channels . And, this art once learned, we can more or less snap our fingers at sleep. Don’t lie awake wishing to go to sleep. You do not need sleep. What you do need is to learn how to lie awake profitably There is not better time than the quiet hours of the night, when outside disturbances are reduced to a minimum, for digesting and assimilating the experiences of the day. In this age of rush few of us have any opportunity for such digestion during the daytime, and, undoubtedly, failure to make one’s experiences one’s own has a weakening effect on the mind. Therefore, everyone, whether he considers himself a good sleeper or not, should employ a definite part of the night in practising this necessary art of “mental digestion” In the first place then, after settling down comfortably in bed, one should proceed to recapitulate the experiences of the day. Here the so-called “bad sleeper” is at an advantage, since his is less likely to drop off to sleep at once, and so to lose the benefits of the lesson. BACK
© Dr. Neil Stanley 2013-2018