Dr Neil Stanley Independent Sleep Expert
BACK Washington Irving, ‘The Adventure of the Mason’, in The Complete Tales of Washington Irving, ed. Charles Neider (Cambridge, Mass., 1998), 491; here "THERE was once upon a time a poor mason, or bricklayer, in Granada, who kept all the Saints'-days and holidays, and Saint Monday into the bargain, and yet, with all his devotion, he grew poorer and poorer, and could scarcely earn bread for his numerous family. One night he was roused from his first sleep by a knocking at his door. He opened it, arid beheld be fore him a tall, meagre, cadaverous-looking priest. This is another example that challenges Ekirch’s assertions that “Typically, descriptions recounted how an aroused individual had "had," "taken," or "gotten" his or her "first sleep." and that “the vast weight of surviving evidence indicates that awakening naturally was routine, not the consequence of disturbed or fitful slumber.” James Fenimore Cooper, The Last of the Mohicans (1826), ed. John McWilliams (Oxford, 2009), 70;  Pass into the other cave, you that need it, and seek for sleep; we must be afoot long before the sun, and make the most of our time to get to Edward, while the Mingoes are taking their morning nap. This passage talks of “their morning nap” but gives no indication that this is related to Ekirch’s conception of ‘segmented sleep’ Nathaniel Hawthorne, ‘Notes of Travel’, in The Complete Writings of Nathaniel Hawthorne, 22 vols. (Boston, 1903), xxii, 346; here We sailed away at eleven, and I was roused from my first sleep by the snorting and hissing of the vessel as she got under way This is another example that challenges Ekirch’s assertions that “Typically, descriptions recounted how an aroused individual had "had," "taken," or "gotten" his or her "first sleep." and that “the vast weight of surviving evidence indicates that awakening naturally was routine, not the consequence of disturbed or fitful slumber.” Charlotte Bronte¨, Jane Eyre  (1847),  ed.  Richard  Nemesvari  (Toronto,  2000),  368; here For some time after I went to bed, I could not sleep--a sense of anxious excitement distressed me. The gale still rising, seemed to my ear to muffle a mournful under-sound; whether in the house or abroad I could not at first tell, but it recurred, doubtful yet doleful at every lull; at last I made out it must be some dog howling at a distance. I was glad when it ceased. On sleeping, I continued in dreams the idea of a dark and gusty night. I continued also the wish to be with you, and experienced a strange, regretful consciousness of some barrier dividing us. During all my first sleep, I was following the windings of an unknown road; total obscurity environed me; rain pelted me; I was burdened with the charge of a little child: a very small creature, too young and feeble to walk, and which shivered in my cold arms, and wailed piteously in my ear. I thought, sir, that you were on the road a long way before me; and I strained every nerve to overtake you, and made effort on effort to utter your name and entreat you to stop-- but my movements were fettered, and my voice still died away inarticulate; while you, I felt, withdrew farther and farther every moment." In context it does not appear that in this passage ‘first sleep’ is related to Ekirch’s conception of ‘segmented sleep’ Charles  Dickens, The Pickwick Papers (1837), ed.  James  Kinsley  (Oxford, 2008),  485, here About half-past twelve o'clock, when Mr. Winkle had been revelling some twenty minutes in the full luxury of his first sleep, he was suddenly awakened by a loud knocking at his chamber door, which, being repeated with increased vehemence, caused him to start up in bed, and inquire who was there, and what the matter was This passage talks of Mr. Winkle being 20 minutes in to “the full luxury of his first sleep” at “About half-past twelve o’clock, whereas Ekirch’s conception of first sleep has it ending around midnight. 613;  here Glancing at all these things with the air of a man who had seen them too often before, to think them worthy of much notice now, my uncle walked up the middle of the street, with a thumb in each waistcoat pocket, indulging from time to time in various snatches of song, chanted forth with such good-will and spirit, that the quiet honest folk started from their first sleep and lay trembling in bed till the sound died away in the distance; when, satisfying themselves that it was only some drunken ne'er-do-weel finding his way home, they covered themselves up warm and fell asleep again. These are more examples that challenge Ekirch’s assertions that “Typically, descriptions recounted how an aroused individual had "had," "taken," or "gotten" his or her "first sleep." and that “the vast weight of surviving evidence indicates that awakening naturally was routine, not the consequence of disturbed or fitful slumber.” Emile Zola, Naıs Micoulin here  Honore de Balzac, La Rabouilleuse here  Alexander Dumas, Les Crimes ce´le`bres, iii, La Marquise de Ganges (Paris, 1840), 9; Gustav Schilling, Die Patienten, 2 vols. (Dresden, 1838), ii, 104; here  Adalbert Stifter, Bunte Steine 2 vols. (Leipzig, 1853), i, 142; here  Benito Perez Galdos, La estafeta romantica (Madrid, 1899), 92; here  Luigi Gualtieri, L’Innominato racconto del secolo XVI, 2 vols. (Milan,  1857), ii, 71; here Silvio  Pellico,  Le  Mie  confessioni  (London,  1836) 145 here  Alexander Serguevich Poushkin, Russian Romance, trans. Mrs J. Buchan Telfer (London, 1875), 17; here I was in that state when reality, giving place to fancies, is mingled with them in the dim visions of first sleep. In context it does not appear that in this passage ‘first sleep’ is related to Ekirch’s conception of ‘segmented sleep’ Count Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace, trans. Constance Garnett (New  York,   1911), 1115–6. here   But nevertheless the fact, communicated in the form of a simple note, with a command for Kuturov and received at night, breaking' in on his first sleep, surprised and irritated the governor. This is another example that challenges Ekirch’s assertions that “Typically, descriptions recounted how an aroused individual had "had," "taken," or "gotten" his or her "first sleep." and that “the vast weight of surviving evidence indicates that awakening naturally was routine, not the consequence of disturbed or fitful slumber.”  BACK
© Dr. Neil Stanley 2013-2018